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Author Topic: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?  (Read 1928 times)

Offline joroas

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How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« on: September 19, 2019, 10:44:46 PM »
I retired 5 years' ago and, in anticipation of this, had bought masses of armies to paint in the days when I was time rich and salary poor! Unfortunately, when you retire you don't suddenly gain 40+ hours a week of hobby time, I seemed to have less than when I worked.  Things slowed right down and I found myself selling masses of stuff on eBay that was never coming out of the box.  I had thought this might be a spur, but I still seem to have masses in the shed untouched and cannot see it moving any year soon. I set up a blog and a five year timetable to motivate myself, both fell woefully behind and then were abandoned as futile exercises!

Now I need to plan a future role for this stuff. As for the past, I haven't played a game since June 2017, the club I occasionally visited folded in August 2017, I haven't visited a show since May 2018 and the last figure I painted was December 2018. I have just started pulling more stuff up for sale, but am torn between keeping some stuff or completely clearing and repurposing the garage.

Anyone else hit this impasse?
« Last Edit: September 19, 2019, 11:18:31 PM by joroas »
'So do all who see such times. But that is not for us to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that we are given.'

Offline tin shed gamer

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Re: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2019, 12:12:56 AM »
Short Answer if you no longer derive pleasure from it .Then find something that you do.
It's not written in stone that its a life long commitment.
Personally my own interest in the hobby waxes and waynes .Which sounds even worse as I sculpt for a living. I've played less than a handful of games in 18 months.
I've bounced in and out the hobby pretty much since my late teen's. When the first Gulf war came along I ditched everything not even  dice left.After that I went to work for Game's Workshop .I couldn't cope with people rolling dice and being armchair generals.So I ditched everything again and became a Nurse. After being stabbed for the second time(the irony is never lost on me) I took up sculpting to relax and ignore the outside world.Just over eight years ago I left Psychiatric nursing and became a full-time sculptor.I found the hobby side bored the pants off me(time painting is time I could be earning.)
I even out what I do by having more than one interest. I stil shoot and train ,and study marital arts.Plus we foster.What I'm trying to say is if I personally just had wargaming as my only outlet. I'd more than likely bin the lot.Because as much as I enjoy it and love creating stuff.I begrudge the time it consumes because it is just stuff ..
But I'm still here plodding along .I find this place a great muse.Which of late has restored some of my mojo for my personal projects and hobby time.

Just keep getting rid of the dead wood until your down to the projects that tug at your heart strings.
There's nothing to say that what ever you do with the garage/hobby area that it shouldn't still have a display cabinet in a corner with something that peaks your interest from time to time.Or it just becomes a dust cover curiosity in the corner as you find something more stimulating to do.
It's all still good if your enjoying yourself.

Mark


Offline Poiter50

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Re: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2019, 01:31:42 AM »
The people I game with keep me in the hobby. When I went through a difficult personal time some years back, they were my support group as well as some very good friends I worked with and kept me sane. I have met many gamers around the world as I tend to try and link up with like minded people at conventions or clubs and there is always the usual mix. You would be surprised to see that there is a very normal mix of people involved in the gaming hobby. The avalanche of new systems we have seen in the last decade has piqued my interest and keep me going even though I will turn 70 early next year.
Cheers,
Poiter50

Online Oldben1

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Re: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2019, 03:09:56 AM »
One thing that really helped me was creating a couple of desktop skirmish sized miniature and terrain packs.   I use small tins or shoeboxes that fit under my couch.  When I watch tv with the kids or my wife I pull the miniatures and bits of terrain and push them across the table for and hour or so.  I do the same thing at my desk at work on lunch breaks.  Itís good fun and packs away quickly.  I have a zombie pack, Star Wars pack, and a dungeon pack.  They are all 15mm so they take up very little space.  I quickly slide the box under the couch when I am done.

As for the stuff you donít use, sell it.  Thank the items for the pleasure they gave you while building and collecting them, and get rid of it.  I have discovered that the creative process of painting and building is more fun for me then displaying and hoarding the finished projects.  Use the money to buy a guitar or take your wife out for ice cream!

Offline Elbows

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Re: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2019, 03:54:32 AM »
Basically, what's been said above.

Set aside the stuff you're not interested in for a while.  If you're still not interested in it for six months - ditch it.

If you have a couple of projects or armies you're passionate about - keep them, just in case.  Remember this hobby doesn't technically have to involve building/painting forces and amassing armies.  Do your fellow hobbyists or fellow gamers have armies/tables/etc?  I know a couple of buddies who could (and I could myself) host games with my opponents or friends needing to only bring snacks or drinks.

Do you have a game you're passionate about but can't motivate yourself to paint/build?  Ditch some stuff and consider having some stuff commission painted/finished if you have the funds.  Then stash it in some boxes and keep it on hand.

If you've really lost the interest - ditch the extraneous stuff, stash some important/rare stuff and take a break.  I didn't game for....5 years at one point, and have taken 9-10 years off from one popular game.

Will a downgraded version of the "hobby" satisfy you?  There are some tremendous board games/card games out there...games which don't require amassing or building armies.  Can you get the same enjoyment out of them?  You might.  Maybe you can shuffle laterally in the hobby space instead of bailing completely.

If you've lost all the passion - take a break, or indeed depart.  It's not a crime.  It's a hobby, not a job.



2019 Painted Miniatures: 104
(2018: 98, 2017: 226, 2016: 233, 2015: 32, 2014: 116)

http://myminiaturemischief.blogspot.com/

Offline Condottiere

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Re: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2019, 04:53:42 AM »
Could significant others be a factor? ;)

Offline Antonio J Carrasco

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Re: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2019, 09:40:59 AM »
Can't say, honestly. When is the right time to stop doing something? I guess that the answer is: when I get no joy from it. Maybe there will be a time I won't, but I am not there yet. With any luck, I never will and death will surprise me with a mini in one hand and a brush in the other. That would be a nice way to go, actually.

Offline Silent Invader

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Re: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« Reply #7 on: September 20, 2019, 09:59:30 AM »
The right time to leave* the hobby? Perhaps when one finds oneself writing and/or opining more than playing**.



*leave meaning a temporary or permanent avoidance

** playing meaning experiencing the reward of tactile fun, be it accumulating, making, painting or gaming etc

NB: for clarity, the above is not a snide remark  :)
Post-apoc survivors are now at http://www.ScavengeSkirmishSurvive.uk

My LAF Gallery is HERE

Offline carlos marighela

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Re: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2019, 10:02:48 AM »
When a priest appears at your bedside?
Eu sempre te amarei
Onde estiver estarei
Oh meu Mengooo

Tu ťs time de tradiÁ„o,
RA«A, AMOR e PAIX√O
Oh meu Mengooo!

Online jon_1066

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Re: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2019, 10:26:26 AM »
When they pries the 95th Rifles from my cold dead hands.

Sounds like you need to find some opponents.  Unless you just like the painting and modelling for its own sake (which it doesn't sound like you do.)  There appears to be a wargame club in Gloucester you could perhaps think about attending.


Offline tuco74

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Re: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« Reply #10 on: September 20, 2019, 12:21:46 PM »
One thing that really helped me was creating a couple of desktop skirmish sized miniature and terrain packs.   I use small tins or shoeboxes that fit under my couch.  When I watch tv with the kids or my wife I pull the miniatures and bits of terrain and push them across the table for and hour or so.  I do the same thing at my desk at work on lunch breaks.  Itís good fun and packs away quickly.  I have a zombie pack, Star Wars pack, and a dungeon pack.  They are all 15mm so they take up very little space.  I quickly slide the box under the couch when I am done.

I like this idea very much, and it also fits with something I've been considering very recently. Great minds think alike...but fools seldom differ.

Offline armchairgeneral

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Re: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« Reply #11 on: September 20, 2019, 12:42:54 PM »
Sounds like you need to find some opponents.  Unless you just like the painting and modelling for its own sake (which it doesn't sound like you do.)  There appears to be a wargame club in Gloucester you could perhaps think about attending.

Agree with this really. I appreciate some people get pleasure from solo gaming but is it not a hobby I could do in isolation though I don't game that often admittedly. I don't particularly like regularly attending clubs but they are useful for meeting like minded people that you could perhaps arrange your own games with.

As for all your stuff, maybe ask yourself what period/project would you save if you could only keep one? Add perhaps a couple more and get rid of everything else?
Current and forecast unpainted leadpile - 535 figures (all 28mm)
Painted 2019 - 6

Offline mcfonz

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Re: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2019, 02:09:48 PM »
I can echo what others have said really in terms of the social side of things.

I am part of a games club and a group of friends that game. Though I find escapism and relaxation in building, painting both miniatures and terrain when I find time. I try to most evenings.

I did a brief piece on some aspects of this on the blog: https://poisonspurs.blogspot.com/2019/02/how-does-our-hobby-work.html

Clubs folding in any arena happen for various reasons but the most common two issues are 1) Needing someone to run it and no one being willing, 2) recruiting of new members to sustain it into the future.

Actually running a club isn't a huge issue, so long as the members remain committed and cough up their subs on time with minimal pestering.

Finding folks happy to take on that responsibility? Quite low. The recruitment can be an issue too. From time to time on here you see how interpretations of what wargaming is can cause clashes. Some of it is 'change' and not all folks are used to change or indeed, want it.

My first piece of advice would be to go to a show, see if you can rekindle any motivation and enthusiasm that way. Also, look around for other clubs to try.

I'm not sure I can ever see me giving up now as a lot of my friends are gamers or people that know what it is and respect it. My sister and my wife both roll dice every now and then despite not being gamers.

Someone mentioned significant others. Perhaps a joke, but a bit lame to be honest. Our hobby is pretty mainstream now. My wife actually insisted on there being a 'space' for me to have my hobby in when it came to buying the house we live in. Mainly because she didn't want it in the rest of the house but also because she understood how important it is to me and my close friends. I know I am lucky for it, but it gives me the opportunity to have 'geek days' where a few like minded folks head over and we do some painting, modeling and gaming.

I guess, community is what I would call it. The club I am at has all ages and all genres of game on offer. I wouldn't want it any other way.

Offline Sparrow

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Re: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« Reply #13 on: September 20, 2019, 07:55:27 PM »
Hi Joroas

Iíve pinned you a message. Iím Tetbury based so not far from you. If having the odd game might help your mojo - get in touch.

Cheers

Ian
Put your trust in God and keep your powder dry!

Offline has.been

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Re: How do you know when it's time to leave the hobby?
« Reply #14 on: September 20, 2019, 08:18:22 PM »
I personally cannot envisage a time when I would give up wargaming, and I have been
doing it since the early 60s. I blow hot & cold on different projects it is true, but I still
enjoy it. Friends & their enthusiasm for different projects helps to keep me happy.
I did, do & will continue to 'thin out' my horde by selling, converting & (sometimes)
giving stuff away, but this allows me to buy 'shiney' things guilt free.
Living the dream.