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Author Topic: A Lighthorseman of the Marches  (Read 569 times)

Offline Plynkes

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A Lighthorseman of the Marches
« on: December 14, 2019, 12:41:00 AM »
So I was in my local park today (and no, I wasn't hanging around the public toilets trying to pick up guys, why would you even think that?) and I chanced upon the war memorial. Never paid it much heed before, but today I had a good look.


You've overdone the verdigris a bit there, mate. Doesn't look very realistic.

The nearby plaque telling the names of all the local fallen from the Great War was quite interesting. Lots of different outfits represented, with the Herefords, the Glosters and the KSLI getting quite a bit of representation, as you'd expect given where I live. But there was one I was not expecting:



Yep, someone from my sleepy, rainy town here on the Welsh border served and died in the Australian Light Horse. How peculiar.  Well I was quite bowled over by this and it got me thinking. I want to commemorate this Trooper Frank Cowles customer in miniature. I've done no painting for over a year due to a prolonged bout of ill health, and this discovery has inspired me to pick up the brushes again. I'm going to buy an ALH figure and paint him up, just for my own entertainment and to honour Trooper Frank. I know, I know, I already have a lead mountain threatening to blot out the sun (it's so bad that Greta Thunberg regularly turns up to protest it), but I feel the occasion demands I splash out on some fresh lead. So wish me luck, I'm going to get painting again, and I actually mean it this time.

By the way, I'm not sure what ALH figures are out there these days, and haven't looked very thoroughly yet, so if you have any recommendations feel free to make a suggestion.

I wonder if that fella saw action at Gaza? And if so I wonder if he bumped into anyone he knew from back home? As the Herefords were involved in the battles for Gaza too.





Thálatta! Thálatta!

Offline Helen

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Re: A Lighthorseman of the Marches
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2019, 01:08:28 AM »
That's a lovely story Dylan. If memory serves, did I not provided you with a small number of ANZAC miniatures many, many years ago?

Will be lovely to see painted. I only know of Brigade Games, but I'm sure your devoted followers can provide other suggestions.

Best wishes,

Helen

Offline Plynkes

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Re: A Lighthorseman of the Marches
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2019, 01:59:29 AM »
Yes, I still have them, Helen, but they aren't really your archetypal Light Horse as I recall. More like infantry. I have had something in mind for them for a while, but like so many things, haven't got around to it yet. I think since I was really into the Great War some years ago some other options have opened up, but I'll find out soon enough.

Not sure I have any devoted followers, mind, but I appreciate the sentiment. :)


Offline monk2002uk

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Re: A Lighthorseman of the Marches
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2019, 01:18:05 PM »
Trooper Cowles is commemorated on the Imperial War Museum web site too. He was born in Herefordshire and emigrated to Australia. Cowles was wounded in the arm near Gaba Tepe (Gallipoli) on 10 August 1915. He died of his wounds in September, back in the UK.

Robert

Offline Plynkes

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Re: A Lighthorseman of the Marches
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2019, 05:27:59 PM »
Thanks, Robert. Nice to get a little bit of his story. It never occurred to me that there might be more information available beyond just a name.


Offline Etranger

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Re: A Lighthorseman of the Marches
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2019, 07:25:42 PM »
Eureka have ALH figures IIRC. A decent proportion of the AIF were originally from the UK who'd emigrated to Oz.

Edit: Eureka's are 15mm. They do however do a 28mm vignette of Gallipoli Anzacs playing Two-up which might be an option.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2019, 07:30:34 PM by Etranger »
"It's only a flesh wound...."

Offline Helen

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Re: A Lighthorseman of the Marches
« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2019, 07:40:21 PM »
Yes, I still have them, Helen, but they aren't really your archetypal Light Horse as I recall. More like infantry. I have had something in mind for them for a while, but like so many things, haven't got around to it yet. I think since I was really into the Great War some years ago some other options have opened up, but I'll find out soon enough.

Not sure I have any devoted followers, mind, but I appreciate the sentiment. :)

Thanks Dylan.

I hope your recovery is going well. Sorry for not saying that initially.

Best wishes,

Helen

Offline Sunray61

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Re: A Lighthorseman of the Marches
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2020, 06:16:19 AM »
643 Trooper Frank Cowles

Note. The records of service of personnel of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) in World War I are held as digital copies on the National Archives of Australia website.

The following personal information is extracted from Tpr Frank Cowles' record of service.

Frank Cowes was born at Lyons Hall Herefordshire, England.  He enlisted in the AIF at Marrickville, Sydney, NSW on 22 Sep 1914.

His personal details on enlistment were:

Age  -  22 years 9 months
Height  -  5 feet 8 inches
Weight  -  10 stone 8 pounds
Chest measurement  -  33 inches/36 inches
Complexion  -  Fair
Eyes  -  Blue
Hair  -  Light brown
Religion  -  Church of England
Marital Status  -  Single
Occupation  -  Butcher

Frank Cowles was initially posted as a Driver to the 1st Reinforcements, 6th Company, Australian Army Service Corps (AASC).

He embarked in Sydney on the Troopship A39 PORT MACQUARIE on 21 Dec 1914 with the initial deployment of the AIF to Egypt.  During the voyage he was classified as medically unfit and he was landed at Colombo, Ceylon [Sri Lanka] on 15 Jan 1915 for medical treatment.  After treatment re re-embarked at Colombo on a later convoy for Egypt and was posted to a Reinforcement draft for the 4th Australian Light Horse Regiment (4 ALH).  Subsequently, on 27 Jul 1915 he was transferred to C Squadron, 4th Australian Light Horse Regiment and deployed to Gallipoli.

The 4th Australian Light Horse Regiment was originally raised as the divisional cavalry regiment for the 1st Australian Infantry Division.  It was not part of the three Australian Light Horse Brigades raised in 1914/15; however, at Gallipoli it was attached to the 2nd Australian Light Horse Brigade to increase the Infantry firepower of the Brigade.  The Australian Light Horse Brigades deployed to Gallipoli were used in a dismounted Infantry role.

Approximately, a quarter of the Light Horse Regiments' personnel were retained in Egypt to maintain, train and exercise the Regiments' horses.  Some 500 of these personnel remaining in Egypt formed the Composite Light Horse Regiment which fought against the Senussi in the Western Desert campaign in 1915-16.

During the major British offensive at Gallipoli in August 1915, 4 ALH as part of 2 ALH Bde provided fire support and diversionary attacks for the main attacks on Lone Pine and The Nek.  4 ALH was located at Ryrie's Post during these attacks.

As part of these operations, on 22 Aug 1915 Tpr Cowles was wounded in action [gunshot wound to the right arm].  He was subsequently evacuated to England.  He died of wounds on 10 Sep 1915 at the Military Hospital, Devonport, England.  His record of service states he was buried at Lyons Hall Churchyard, Leemington [?] Herefordshire, England on 14 Sep 1915.  Grave number 88 Section C.

After the evacuation of Gallipoli in December 1915, the 4th Australian Light Horse Regiment was reduced to two squadrons and the unit temporarily removed from the order of battle.  One squadron went to France in mid-1916 with the four Australian Infantry Divisions reformed after the Gallipoli evacuation (the 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th Divisions) as the Corps mounted troops.  The other squadron was retained in Egypt for detached duties until the 4th  Light Horse Regiment was re-raised in 1917 as part of the new 4th Australian Light Horse Brigade.

Tpr Cowles did not fight at Gaza.  The three battles of Gaza were fought between March and October 1917.  The new 4th Light Horse Regiment was the right forward regiment in the charge at Beersheba culminating the third Battle of Gaza.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2020, 07:39:50 AM by Westfalia Chris »

Offline Sunray61

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Re: A Lighthorseman of the Marches
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2020, 06:19:28 AM »
My apologies for the poor layout of my post above.

I am still trying to work out what happened.

Sunray61

Offline Westfalia Chris

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Re: A Lighthorseman of the Marches
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2020, 07:42:04 AM »
My apologies for the poor layout of my post above.

I am still trying to work out what happened.

Sunray61

No worries, there were some formatting tags left at the start. I changed it to a standard formatting, feel free to add some if it helps with legibility.

Offline Sunray61

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Re: A Lighthorseman of the Marches
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2020, 08:14:05 AM »
Westfalia Chris,

Many thanks for sorting this out for me.

Sunray61