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Author Topic: The generic tools thread.  (Read 20165 times)

Offline Zaheer

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Re: The generic tools thread.
« Reply #15 on: October 11, 2015, 07:39:53 PM »
I normally just make up a lego form when I need to hold something at 90 degrees. I like the idea of the magnets, though, and now find myself wondering if I can magnetise lego ???

I'm sure you could! It should be easy enough to get the magnets up "underneath" the blocks - you could flip them so that the hollow side of the blocks faces upwards to keep the magnets from falling out while you maneuver them around. Thanks for the idea!

Offline 6milPhil

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Re: The generic tools thread.
« Reply #16 on: December 21, 2015, 03:44:30 PM »
I got hold of one of these today. It's a dispensing bottle for Plastic Weld (dichloromethane) apparently also called a tutty bottle. I saw these ages ago on the EMA site, but they want a whopping £16+VAT for it, and I was going to buy one when I wanted some other bits, but their wobbly service and typically higher prices meant I never got around to it.



Flipping the lid reveals this


Press down on the lightly sprung lid and a brush worth of glue is pumped up.


And then you've a loaded brush and no evaporation. It also eliminates spills.


Just £6.50 from Fenris: http://fenrisgames.com/shop#!/Tools-&-Equipment/c/15856111/offset=0&sort=normal  8)

Offline Vermis

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Re: The generic tools thread.
« Reply #17 on: December 28, 2015, 09:21:30 PM »
Ooh.

It's a dispensing bottle for Plastic Weld (dichloromethane)

Same as any liquid poly cement? I'm looking at my bottle of Humbrol liquid poly but no mention what it actually is.

Offline 6milPhil

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Re: The generic tools thread.
« Reply #18 on: December 29, 2015, 07:38:45 AM »
I'm not sure that it's identical, but they share the same function - the bottle would work for that too.

Offline Connectamabob

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Re: The generic tools thread.
« Reply #19 on: February 07, 2016, 12:37:21 PM »
A few mundane recommends:

I had a lot of difficulty in the past finding good pin vises. I tried a bunch of different brands, and none of them could hold a bit straight. Even the "good" brands like X-Acto seemed to come from the same slipshod third-world machine shops as the no-name ones. Last year I got one of these:
http://www.hlj.com/product/TAM74112/Sup
And finally I have a GOOD pin vise. This thing is properly precision machined, and is one of those rare tools that has that old-school feeling of perfection in all it's little details. Strange thing to crow about such a simple, basic tool, but there you go. The Japanese take their tools seriously.

This month I got a scroll saw. Yeah, laser cutters are all the rage now, but even the cheap ones cost over a grand. The scroll saw I got only cost about 100$. I've only done some testing with it so far, but I can already tell it's gonna be HUGE boost for scratchbuilding stuff. I should have gotten one of these 20 years ago!  If you're interested in scratchbuilding vehicles or buildings, I recommend one.

My favorite airbrushes (I kind of have a small collection of them now, which is an odd thought):

http://www.amazon.com/Iwata-HP-TH-Airbrush-japan-import/dp/B004DUHUKG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1454841880&sr=8-1&keywords=HP-TH
This is *the* boss for efficient priming and basecoating. That is its niche, and it handles it like Jessie Ventura handles a minigun.

http://www.caseylovestudio.com/ab_pricing-tables/
This is a special variant of the Badger SOTAR, sold exclusively though CLS. If you want an airbrush for freehand work that feels like drawing with a pen instead of a regular AB, this is the one. Get a 1/16oz color cup for it, and attach it directly to one of those thin black poly hoses, and it's incredibly light and dexterous.

On the more odd/exotic end of things, I also got an "air eraser" recently. That's a sort of like a micro-sandblaster, or like a single action airbrush that sprays abrasive powder instead of paint. Paasche and Badger both make ones, and there's a bunch of Chinese cheapies that are clones of the Paasche design. I got the Badger one (I avoid the cheap Chinese tools these days, and don't have much confidence in Paasche as my experiences with their airbrushes have been bad). It's kind of a specialty tool, but it has some interesting uses in weathering and surface prep.

But also I had a cockamamie idea of using it to sculpt insulation foam. I've never heard of anyone doing that, but if it works, it might be a neat way of making organic shapes. Fingers crossed.
History viewed from the inside is always a dark, digestive mess, far different from the easily recognizable cow viewed from afar by historians.

Offline Mason

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Re: The generic tools thread.
« Reply #20 on: February 07, 2016, 12:51:49 PM »
But also I had a cockamamie idea of using it to sculpt insulation foam. I've never heard of anyone doing that, but if it works, it might be a neat way of making organic shapes. Fingers crossed.

That sounds like an excellent idea.

Please show us some results.
 :D


Offline Connectamabob

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Re: The generic tools thread.
« Reply #21 on: February 25, 2016, 02:40:38 AM »
Small update on the air eraser:

I tried it out for the first time today. I've had it for a few weeks, but it's a messy tool, so it needed a good opportunity to come together. Things I learned:

1) It's an air hog. My little airbrush compressor is not up to the task. It needs I think at least 60psi (my compressor tops out at 40), and IDK how much CFM.  A shop compressor with a tank will prolly be alright (I have one but it sounds like an entire herd of elephants having a farting contest, so I rarely take it out).

2) The Badger model will spray baking soda without modification, HOWEVER: you definitely need to sift the soda before loading it, and ensure your air line is very dry, as soda tends to clog easily. Aluminum oxide sprays easier and is more aggressive abrasive than soda, but causes mega itching if it gets on your skin (so wear long sleeves). Also baking soda, having finer particles, produces a more crisp and smooth etching.

3) Carving foam works, but only barely, barely at the max pressure I tested at; not usably. Gonna dig out the shop compressor and bump the PSI up to 80, see where that gets me. Also: the blasting media gets embedded in the foam. Mostly that just means it changes the foam's surface color. At 40 psi I was able to etch about 1mm deep per slow pass using aluminum oxide, and lightly embossed sort of lines with soda.May not just be a PSI thing, as noted above, but a CFM thing as well.

4) WEAR A RESPIRATOR. NOT A DUST MASK: A RESPIRATOR. Also: safety glasses.

Offline Vanvlak

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Re: The generic tools thread.
« Reply #22 on: September 16, 2017, 06:30:58 PM »
Lazy rivets.

Ok, they're not rivets at all, but look good as a joining method which leaves visible marks.



I found this set of Spanish nail punches for € 4.75 or thereabouts, and I tried lightly punching plasticard, seen to the side washed for some visibility. The smallest punch, 0.7mm, produce a neat, small ring which looks like a recessed rivet. Fast too, although you obviously have to mark the punch locations out to space them evenly.
The bigger ones (1.5mm and 2.3 mm) could be useful to produce larger circular impressions.

Offline Hammers

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Re: The generic tools thread.
« Reply #23 on: September 18, 2017, 09:45:46 AM »
Lazy rivets.

Ok, they're not rivets at all, but look good as a joining method which leaves visible marks.



I found this set of Spanish nail punches for € 4.75 or thereabouts, and I tried lightly punching plasticard, seen to the side washed for some visibility. The smallest punch, 0.7mm, produce a neat, small ring which looks like a recessed rivet. Fast too, although you obviously have to mark the punch locations out to space them evenly.
The bigger ones (1.5mm and 2.3 mm) could be useful to produce larger circular impressions.


I've used this method. Works fine for recessed rivets although punching a line of rivets tend to warp the plastic somewhat.

Offline Vanvlak

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Re: The generic tools thread.
« Reply #24 on: September 18, 2017, 10:27:55 AM »

Yep - you have to be very gentle with the hammering, and strike a balance between a good impression and bashing through the modelling table. Not to mention taking care to try to avoid warping, which should (I have not tried it!) be curable by relieving the stresses by a warm water bath and/or the application of weights.

Offline Hammers

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Re: The generic tools thread.
« Reply #25 on: September 18, 2017, 02:46:16 PM »

which should (I have not tried it!) be curable by relieving the stresses by a warm water bath and/or the application of weights.


Stellar.

Offline dampfpanzerwagon

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Re: The generic tools thread.
« Reply #26 on: April 06, 2018, 02:00:01 PM »
New High-End tools from DSPIAE

I have just seen this post over on The Modelling News and thought it was sharing.



For full details see this link;
http://www.themodellingnews.com/2018/04/andy-examines-three-new-tools-from.html#more

Tony

Offline dampfpanzerwagon

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Re: The generic tools thread.
« Reply #27 on: April 07, 2018, 04:59:52 PM »

Offline Hammers

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Re: The generic tools thread Rivet punch tool
« Reply #28 on: April 20, 2018, 12:50:12 PM »


swiss beading/graving/graining tool is what you need:


Come in sets from stupidly small to >1mm

They do the same job as the syringe without any need for making stuff.

I use them with miliput or greestuff but can also be used on plain plasticard for recessed rivets.

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/grainers-sets

Offline dampfpanzerwagon

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Re: The generic tools thread.
« Reply #29 on: May 01, 2018, 12:36:41 PM »
My new Airbrush Compressor and Airbrush set from BARTSHARP



For details see my Blog.

Tony
http://dampfpanzerwagon.blogspot.co.uk/2018/05/may-day-treat-new-airbrush-and.html

 

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