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Author Topic: Raglan's Armies and Enemies of the French King Louis XIV 1665 to 1680  (Read 43019 times)

Offline nicknorthstar

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Really good Raglan.

Offline Lord Raglan

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Really good Raglan.

I would love to see that big galleon of yours docked in my habour  :-*

.....and that's not a euphemism you naughty boy  ;)

Offline Lord Raglan

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Régiment d'Artois



The regiment was raised on 24 April 1610 for the Comte de Beaumont Saint-Vallier when Henri IV made his great preparations to fight the Habsburg. It was disbanded after the assassination of Henry IV a few weeks later. The regiment was re-established on 15 August 1615 and disbanded for a second time on 6 May 1616. It was definitively re-established again on 9 September of the same year. From then on, it belonged to the regular regiments later designated as “Petits-Vieux”, ranking 6th among them until 1670.



In 1653, during the last years of the Franco-Spanish War (1635–59), the regiment took part in the defence of Picardie and in the sieges of Rhétel and Sainte-Ménehould. In 1654, it garrisoned various places in Flanders and participated in the capture of Beverloo. From 1655 to 1657, the regiment assumed garrison duties in Le Quesnoy. In 1658, it joined the Army of Champagne.



In 1667, at the outbreak of the War of Devolution (1667–68), the regiment served in the Duchy of Luxembourg. In 1668, it contributed to the conquest of Franche-Comté and took part in the siege of Dôle. In 1669, the regiment formed part of the relief expedition sent to the help of the Venetians defending Candia (present-day Heraklion) in Crete against the Turks. The regiment suffered heavy losses in this unsuccessful expedition.



In 1672, at the beginning of the Franco-Dutch War (1672–78), the regiment campaigned in Holland. In 1673, it took part in the siege of Maastricht. The same year, the regiment received the name of the Province of Artois when the regiment previously known by this name received the privilege of becoming a royal regiment under the name of La Couronne Infanterie. The new Artois Infanterie ended the campaign at Stenay and at the camp of Sédan where it remained for several months. In 1674, it took part in the Battle of Séneffe, in the Battle of Ensheim and in the combats of Mulhausen and Turckheim; in 1675, in the combat of Consaarbrûck and in the defence of Trier suffering very heavy losses. In 1676, the regiment was rebuilt. In 1677, it took part in the sieges of Valenciennes and Cambrai; in 1678, in the sieges of Ghent and Ypres. It was then transferred to Germany. In 1679, it fought in the combat of Minden.

Offline nicknorthstar

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Fantastic history.

Offline nicknorthstar

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Big ship sails on the ally-ally-oh

Offline Lord Raglan

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That really is a beauty, I'd love to get my hands on one  :-*

Offline Lord Raglan

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The English Brigade in the French Service 1672-1678

Douglas's / Dumbarton's / The Royal Scots
This Scottish Rgt had been in the French Service since the first part of the 17th C, but had returned to England at the Restoration. With the raising of the English Standing Army in 1661 it was unnecessary for the regt to remain in England, and so it returned to France in 1662. It was again recalled to England for the 2nd Dutch War, but back to France in 1667. There it continued until 1678 when it was finally summoned home to serve on the English establishment as the First Royal Regt of Foot, or the Royal Scots. Twelve companies of 100 men each.

Services
1673-4 Rhine Theatre under Turenne
1674 Battle of Sintzheim
1675 Siege of Dachstein, Siege of Treves
1676 Siege of Philippsburg
1677 Siege of Freiburg

The Royal English Regiment
Sometimes referred to as Monmouth's Foot or the 'Old Battalion of Monmouth's Foot. It was raised in England in 1672 and sent over to France, where it remained until recalled into England in 1678. Sixteenth companies, totaling 2,000 men.

Services
1673 Siege of Maestricht
1674 Rhine Theatre under Turenne,Battle of Sintzheim, Battle of Entzheim
1675 Battle of Altenheim
1676 Siege of Philippsburg

Skelton's / 2nd Battalion of the Royal English
This bn was drawn from the standing regts in England. It went over to France in 1672 to replace the eight companies of the Royal English which had been disbanded. Once across the Channel, Skelton's was retained as a seperate unit and acted as the 2nd Bn The Royal English. In 1673 this bn was granted seniority over the original battalion as it was composed of guardsmen. This caused great jealousy betwen the two formations.
The companies of Skelton, Daniell and Sackville were recalled to England in Apr 1674. John Churchill assumed command of the remaining five companies and amalgamated them with the Earl of Peterborough's Regiment to form a new regiment which continued in France until 1677.

Services
1674 Rhine Theatre under Turenne, Battle of Entzheim
1675 Battle of Altenheim
1676 Siege of Philippsburg

The Life Guards
On 10 feb 1673 a composite troop of cavalry was taken from the three troops of the Life Guards and sent to France under the command of Louis de Duras, Marquis de Blanquefort. This special troop remained in France until 1674, although Duras stayed in France to command the English Brigade after that date.

Services
1673 Siege of Maestricht

Sir Henry Jones's Light Horse / Monmouth's Horse
A company of English Gens d'Armes was rasied for the French service by Sir George Hamilton in 1667 from the catholic officers who had been dismissed from the English establishment following the purge of 15 Sept 1667. Sir Henry Jones, a capatin in the Royal Horse Guards, was a lieutenant of this company, with Lord Morpeth as cornet. In 1671 Jones replaced Hamilton as commander when the company was expanded to a full size regiment. Total of 505 men.

Services
1673 Siege of Maestricht
1674 Rhine Theatre under Turenne, Battle of Entzheim, Battle of Waldheim
1676 Siege of Philippsburg

The Irish Regiment / Hamilton's / Dongan's
Sir Geroge Hamilton rasied this regiment in Ireland during 1671 especially for France. It was disbanded in France in 1678, returned to Ireland, and was then reformed under Thomas Dogan in the same year. Under Justin Macartie it returned to France as a mercenary regiment in 1679. Fifteen companies of 100 men each.

Services
1673-4 Rhine Theatre under urenne, Battle of Sintzheim, Battle of Entzheim
1675 Battle of Altenheim
1676 Siege of Philippsburg, action at Saverne

Roscommon's Irish Regiment
This Irish regt was rasied for French service in 1671 by Wentworth Dillion, Earl of Rosccommon, but it enjoyed a very short life. In 1672 it was disbanded in Lorraine by the French and the soldiers drafted into Hamilton's Regt. Twelve companies of 100 men each.

Sir William Lockhart's Scottish Regiment
Lockhart's went to France in 1673 and was used to recruit the Old Battalion of the Royal English.

John, Lord Vaughan's Regiment
Vaughan's was sent to France in 1673 and was again used to fill the ranks of the Old Battalion of the Royal English.

Earl of Peterbourgh's Regiment
This regiment went to France in 1673 and was amalgamated with the remnants of Skelton's Battalion to form Churchill's Foot.

Ref: John Childs The Army of Charles II (1984)
« Last Edit: May 11, 2019, 08:45:53 PM by Lord Raglan »

Offline chema1986

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What a nice regiment! and superb ship. This thread is a gem!

Offline nicknorthstar

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I did an English regiment.
The command stand is in French grey, but the musketeers are painted as Marines. They are the Admirals Regt, that became the Royal Marines and the Buffs. I think I did them as a 'what if' the English had beaten the Dutch at Solebay and had landed troops in Holland. They can also man the big ship.

The English flags were made by Flags of War. I'm not sure if they are in his catalogue, but he put them together for me.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2019, 10:12:25 AM by nicknorthstar »

Offline nicknorthstar

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The first picture are my Dumbarton's in French service.

The second is the Coldstream guards. They would have been dressed in Grey in French service (elements served in the 2nd Batt. English Regt.), but I couldn't resist doing a unit in Red and green, with the pike in reverse colours.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2019, 10:07:33 AM by nicknorthstar »

Offline Lord Raglan

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Re: Raglan's Armies and Enemies of the French King Louis XIV 1665 to 1680
« Reply #100 on: May 12, 2019, 06:26:28 PM »
I don't think I can resist not painting my Coldstream Guards in anything but traditional red.

Offline Lord Raglan

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Re: Raglan's Armies and Enemies of the French King Louis XIV 1665 to 1680
« Reply #101 on: May 12, 2019, 06:30:47 PM »
Régiment du Dauphin



The regiment was created by Louis XIV for his son the Dauphin de France on June 15, 1667. Initially the regiment ranked 45th. During the War of Devolution (1667–68), the regiment served with the Army of Flanders and assumed garrison duty in Charleroi after the capture of this city. In 1668, the regiment campaigned in Franche-Comté and distinguished itself at the sieges of Besançon and Dôle. It was then charged to demolish the fortifications of Dôle which it evacuated on June 10 to go to Tournai. In 1669 at Tournai, the remnants of the regiment of the Marquis de Linières was incorporated into Dauphin Infanterie who also inherited its rank (16th), just after Lyonnais Infanterie.



In 1670, the regiment campaigned in Lorraine under M. de Créqui, taking part in the sieges of Epinal, Chasté and Longwy. In 1671, it was increased to 70 companies; till then Louis XIV wanted that his son, even though he was still a child, had only a lieutenant-colonel. He changed his mind and created a charge of colonel-lieutenant for the regiment.



In 1672, at the outbreak of the Franco-Dutch War (1672–78), the regiment formed part of the Army of Holland and was at the siege of Orsoy, Rheinberg, Doësbourg and Nijmegen and at the affair of Bommel Island. The regiment was then transferred to Turenne's Army and took its winter-quarters on the Moselle. In January 1673, it took part in the expedition in the estates of the Elector of Brandenburg and was at the capture of Unna, Kamen and Soëst. After pushing the enemy back to the Elbe, it returned to its winter-quarters. In May, a detachment of the regiment took part in a combat near Bois-le-Duc against the garrison of Crèvecoeur, later making itself master of Crèvecoeur and razed it before retiring to Kayserswerth. From June the rest of the regiment took part in the siege of Maastricht where, on 24 June, it distinguished itself in the storming of the covert way of a defensive work, losing 37 officers and 224 men. The regiment then participated in the siege of Trier before taking its winter-quarters in Burgundy. In 1674, the regiment took part in the siege of Besançon and in the capture of Dôle where it distinguished itself so much that Louis XIV gave regiments to seven of its captain. After the conquest of Franche-Comté, the regiment was sent to Trier and then to Soissons where it took its winter-quarters. In 1675, it formed part of the Army of the Low Countries and covered the sieges of Dinant, Huy and Limbourg; taking its winter-quarters in Avesnes. However in November, it was sent to Brittany to quench troubles. In 1676, it returned to Flanders and took part in the siege of Condé, Bouchain and Aire, in the relief of Maastricht. Meanwhile in May 9 companies were besieged in Philisbourg during three months, capitulating only when all ammunition had been exhausted. In 1677, the regiment took part in the sieges of Valenciennes and Cambrai, and in the relief of Charleroi. It took its winter-quarters in Cassel. In 1678, it took part in the siege of Ghent. Increased to 3 battalions, it then participated in the capture of Ypres and in the Battle of Saint-Denis.

Offline Ben Waterhouse

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Re: Raglan's Armies and Enemies of the French King Louis XIV 1665 to 1680
« Reply #102 on: May 12, 2019, 06:31:39 PM »
Utterly lovely
Arma Pacis Fulcra

Offline Lord Raglan

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Re: Raglan's Armies and Enemies of the French King Louis XIV 1665 to 1680
« Reply #103 on: May 21, 2019, 10:02:55 PM »
17th Century Tavern - The Coach & Horses





Beautifully done by David Marshall  :-*

Offline Friends of General Haig

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Re: Raglan's Armies and Enemies of the French King Louis XIV 1665 to 1680
« Reply #104 on: May 21, 2019, 10:57:25 PM »
A stunning looking building. Would be very happy to pop in there for a pint  :D