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Author Topic: Advice needed on fixing a priming failure  (Read 972 times)

Offline Pattus Magnus

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Advice needed on fixing a priming failure
« on: December 08, 2022, 04:49:52 PM »
A friend was priming some larger models and ended up with a textured, and in some places lumpy finish (pics below). From what he told me, he was using GW primer in an unheated garage (about 9 degrees Celsius).

So, what is recommended for stripping off the primer?

And, how warm should the space be to avoid future priming failures? (He’s considering getting a space heater…)

Offline Dags

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Re: Advice needed on fixing a priming failure
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2022, 05:14:38 PM »
Gut feeling is that he was too close and/or too heavy with his rattle can rather than it being anything temperature related.

Offline Vanvlak

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Re: Advice needed on fixing a priming failure
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2022, 05:17:50 PM »
Gut feeling is that he was too close and/or too heavy with his rattle can rather than it being anything temperature related.
Ditto that.

Offline 2010sunburst

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Re: Advice needed on fixing a priming failure
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2022, 05:43:48 PM »
Looks like orange peeling to me.  This indicates the spray nozzle was too far from the workpiece and so the paint partially dried before hitting the surface.  It then fails to flow out and even up the surface finish before drying.  Spray is also too heavy and potentially has been directed straight at the piece.  It’s best to start and finish the spray pass off of the object being sprayed.   Not temperature related at all, I’m afraid, that just affects drying time. 
Best way to strip this would be something like a soak in fairy power spray or oven cleaner.  Might take a couple of goes though.  Soak it overnight, keeping it inside so the solution stays warm enough to react, and scrub it with an old toothbrush to cut through the softened paint.  Wear eye protection and gloves, especially with oven cleaner, because it can be nasty stuff.  Don’t use commercial paint strippers, they contain solvents that may melt the plastic.

Offline Major_Gilbear

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Re: Advice needed on fixing a priming failure
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2022, 06:13:04 PM »
Everything 2010sunburst said, with two added comments of my own:

1) Temperature does matter, as it affects paint flow out of the can - standing the can in some warm (not hot!) water before use, and shaking thoroughly during the warming process produces a better flow of paint if it's cold. I only spray in temps between 10C and 20C as I found this to be the most reliable range. On warm days, I don't spray in sunshine either - find a shadier spot to spray in if you can.

2) Humidity affects the spray finish too. Very dry, or very humid, conditions cause the spray to "fuzz" on the model. So if it rained in the morning, but it's sunny after lunch, don't spray then as the air will be still be quite humid and your spray will likely come out rough.

As for fixing it, I'd use some Biostrip20 or similar. Brush it on all over the model, and put it in a plastic bag to keep the stuff moist whilst it strips the paint. I'd leave it overnight if you can. Then, under a running warm tap, gently brush off all the gloop with a toothbrush. You may need to repeat the whole process, but it's incredibly good on plastic figures. Try not to touch the gloop if you can - it'll crack your skin like bleach does! Use vinyl gloves to protect yourself, as the gloop goes through latex and nitrile ones. There's no fumes or odour from the gloop, and it's safe to rinse down the kitchen sink.

Offline Pattus Magnus

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Re: Advice needed on fixing a priming failure
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2022, 06:29:00 PM »
A local friend swears by Tamiya paint remover, any experiences with that product?

Offline 2010sunburst

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Re: Advice needed on fixing a priming failure
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2022, 06:47:03 PM »
Never used it I’m afraid.  I’m sure it would work, but it looks to be about twenty times more expensive, and only comes in 250 mL cans that I can see. 

Offline Pattus Magnus

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Re: Advice needed on fixing a priming failure
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2022, 07:01:06 PM »
Yeah, that’s a drawback.

I’m actually a little surprised that GW doesn’t sell their own version of that paint stripper. They could call it “Drukhari Tears” or something, and it would be the perfect counterpart to their spray paints, take the money to put on the paint, and take it to get it off… Of course maybe they just prefer to sell a second copy of the kit when someone over sprays.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2022, 07:07:34 PM by Pattus Magnus »

Offline Captain Harlock

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Re: Advice needed on fixing a priming failure
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2022, 12:56:50 AM »
Dettol the straight stinky hospital smelling one in the bottle. Soak the plastics in for afew hours, then with a toothbrush dipped in Dettol start scrubbing them. WARNING if there is any superglue or epoxy on the model it will be gone too. Also DONT USE WATER while scrubbing them it will create an annoying gunk that will take time to clean up. Once they are stripped then you can wash them. If you leave them in overnight you might experience white stains on the plastic. Not recommended for resin.

Offline Daeothar

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Re: Advice needed on fixing a priming failure
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2022, 11:22:16 AM »
Yeah, that’s a drawback.

I’m actually a little surprised that GW doesn’t sell their own version of that paint stripper. They could call it “Drukhari Tears” or something, and it would be the perfect counterpart to their spray paints, take the money to put on the paint, and take it to get it off… Of course maybe they just prefer to sell a second copy of the kit when someone over sprays.

I'm not. They'd rather you buy some new models as opposed to re-using old ones...  ;)
Miniatures you say? Well I too, like to live dangerously...
Everybody has a plan, until they get punched in the face - Mike Tyson

Offline Hobgoblin

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Re: Advice needed on fixing a priming failure
« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2022, 11:39:37 AM »
As for fixing it, I'd use some Biostrip20 or similar. Brush it on all over the model, and put it in a plastic bag to keep the stuff moist whilst it strips the paint. I'd leave it overnight if you can. Then, under a running warm tap, gently brush off all the gloop with a toothbrush. You may need to repeat the whole process, but it's incredibly good on plastic figures. Try not to touch the gloop if you can - it'll crack your skin like bleach does! Use vinyl gloves to protect yourself, as the gloop goes through latex and nitrile ones. There's no fumes or odour from the gloop, and it's safe to rinse down the kitchen sink.

I'd second this - Biostrip's great (though I've never used gloves with it nor had any ill-effects). The lack of fumes and the efficiency with which it works make it unbeatable, I reckon.

Offline 2010sunburst

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Re: Advice needed on fixing a priming failure
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2022, 01:30:05 PM »
Good to hear about biostrip20.  That’s a new one on me and I will file it away for future use.

Offline Major_Gilbear

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Re: Advice needed on fixing a priming failure
« Reply #12 on: December 09, 2022, 01:30:34 PM »
I'd second this - Biostrip's great (though I've never used gloves with it nor had any ill-effects). The lack of fumes and the efficiency with which it works make it unbeatable, I reckon.

I have seen many people handle it without gloves too... However, every time I get the stuff on my hands, even after washing and rinsing thoroughly, the skin where contact occurred usually cracks and peels about 12 hours later. I don't have particularly sensitive or damaged skin, so I don't know why it would affect me but not you (for example)!

Anyway, for the sake of pair of cheap vinyl gloves, I'd always recommend using them.

Offline Pattus Magnus

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Re: Advice needed on fixing a priming failure
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2022, 04:45:51 PM »
Thanks for the advice everyone! I passed the suggestions along to my friend and it sounds like he had some plans to sort out the priming flaws.

It’s been educational for me too, I have a few figures that could use a new paint job, so I’ll be applying some of the techniques myself!

 

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