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Author Topic: Battle of the Somme 1916  (Read 1155 times)

Offline monk2002uk

  • Mad Scientist
  • Posts: 677
Battle of the Somme 1916
« on: February 07, 2023, 01:46:58 PM »
Here is a view of Mametz, with the German defending infantry companies waiting the British assault:



German field gun battery hidden in Bernafay Wood:



The figures are Baccus 6mm. The building, latex trenches and roads, and trees are from TimeCast. The rolling terrain is based on contemporaneous terrain maps, reproduced as 20m contour levels with a heavy felt terrain mat overlaid.

Robert

Offline monk2002uk

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Re: Battle of the Somme 1916
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2023, 04:08:58 PM »
Here is British 89th Brigade forming up at the foot of Montauban ridge, operating on the right wing of the British attack on July 1st 1916:



Robert

Offline monk2002uk

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Re: Battle of the Somme 1916
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2023, 10:08:24 AM »
Montauban is one of the many battles that were successful, with low casualties. Here is the battlefield, covering the equivalent of an area 4 km x 6 km.



The British front line is nearest the bottom of the photo. The advance covered the battlefield and reached the furthest German trench line just beyond Montauban with about 5,000 casualties total (out of the two infantry divisions that attacked).

Robert

Offline Baron von Wreckedoften

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Re: Battle of the Somme 1916
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2023, 06:54:52 PM »
Looks like a splendid set-up!

On a purely technical point, what happened to roads, especially the better ones, that bisected both sets of trenches?  I have always assumed that they were blocked off before they reached the "lines" on each side, but was that actually the case?
No plan survives first contact with the dice.

Offline monk2002uk

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Re: Battle of the Somme 1916
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2023, 04:05:54 PM »
Thank you.

The issue of roads was handled in many different ways so no standard approach that I know of. Trenches might be dug through them, over the top, or, in some cases, under them. After tanks were introduced by the British, the Germans started blowing huge craters in roads in No-man's Land.

Robert

Offline monk2002uk

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  • Posts: 677
Re: Battle of the Somme 1916
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2023, 09:33:02 PM »
Here is a British division- and a corps HQ near the ruins of Carnoy:



Robert

Offline monk2002uk

  • Mad Scientist
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Re: Battle of the Somme 1916
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2023, 09:26:31 AM »
A little-known effect of the build-up to July 1st 1916 was von Falkenhaynís refusal to provide reserves to the threatened Somme sectors. The German Second Army was only able to transfer forces within its command. German infantry reserves and artillery were sent north to provide extra protection for Serre and Gommecourt sectors. This facilitated the success of southern British and French attacks, including the attack on Montauban.

The photo below shows the table set up for the Joy of Six show, commemorating the 100th Anniversary of the Battle of the Somme in 2016. The whole battlefield is 16 feet long: 



Robert

Offline Baron von Wreckedoften

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Re: Battle of the Somme 1916
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2023, 09:29:04 AM »
Thanks for the answer to my question on roads - much appreciated!

Offline monk2002uk

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Re: Battle of the Somme 1916
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2023, 02:05:14 PM »
You're welcome.

Here is the preparatory bombardment in the Montauban sector:



The explosion and gas markers are from Litko. The British did shell the German artillery with SK gas shells on 1st July 1916. The markers indicate Caterpillar Valley and Bernafay Wood.

Robert

Offline monk2002uk

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Re: Battle of the Somme 1916
« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2023, 11:07:40 AM »
Here is Montauban under fire from the French heavy 22cm mortars, part of Group de Menthon attached to British XIII Corps:



The photo was taken with my new telephoto lens.

Robert

Offline monk2002uk

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Re: Battle of the Somme 1916
« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2023, 04:56:13 AM »
Another photo taken with the new telephoto lens. This time it is the brick factory (a Leven Miniatures product) near Montauban, with a German regimental HQ in residence (6mm Baccus figures). A Litko marker denotes the use of non-persistent gas shelling on Bernafay Wood:



Robert
« Last Edit: February 21, 2023, 05:18:48 AM by monk2002uk »

Offline fred

  • Scatterbrained Genius
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    • Miniature Gaming
Re: Battle of the Somme 1916
« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2023, 06:34:51 AM »
The photo below shows the table set up for the Joy of Six show, commemorating the 100th Anniversary of the Battle of the Somme in 2016. The whole battlefield is 16 feet long: 




That is some table setup!

Offline monk2002uk

  • Mad Scientist
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Re: Battle of the Somme 1916
« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2023, 07:46:38 PM »
Thanks.

17th King's Liverpool Battalion waits for the barrage to lift:



Robert

 

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