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Author Topic: Vehicles: scratchbuilding for production  (Read 2040 times)

Offline Christian

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Vehicles: scratchbuilding for production
« on: September 25, 2010, 01:26:13 PM »
Hello everyone,

I'm planning on scratchbuilding a vehicle, and was wondering how I would be better off building it if I want it ready for production.

I *think* I'd be better off making the wheels detachable, but other than that... anything else I need to consider?

It is a small vehicle, open topped... but I don't want to give much more away than that :/

Hope to hear more about it soon!

Offline Sangennaru

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Re: Vehicles: scratchbuilding for production
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2010, 01:58:16 PM »
take the smaller part separately: expecially if you are thinking to go with the resin, you'll find many problems with bubbles, so... be careful for that.

and... well, it depends on the shape of the vehicle. it should be really great for you to have many monovalve moulds instead a big one, cause they are much easy to cast and work with.

whatelse... dunno! :)
good luck! :)

Offline Antenociti

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Re: Vehicles: scratchbuilding for production
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2010, 02:26:46 PM »
I'm planning on scratchbuilding a vehicle, and was wondering how I would be better off building it if I want it ready for production.

It's completely dependent on the shape of the vehicle and how you intend to cast it Christian.
Different casting techniques can achieve different results, meaning differences in how you construct the Master itself.

Not much help I know - but its a bit of a "How long is a piece of string?" question I'm afraid.
\"You don\'t need eyes to see, you need vision.\"

Offline Brandlin

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Re: Vehicles: scratchbuilding for production
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2010, 07:39:02 PM »
"How long is a piece of string?"

Twice the distance from the middle to one end.


Offline Mancha

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Re: Vehicles: scratchbuilding for production
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2010, 07:50:31 PM »
Some advice that I understand applies to both metal- and resin-casting is that cavities should be filled.  So if you end up making a hollow box as part of your build, you will probably need to fill the hollow.

Offline Christian

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Re: Vehicles: scratchbuilding for production
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2010, 12:09:19 AM »
Thanks for the helpful tips so far everyone. I know it is a general question, but it appears there are a few "rules of thumb" involved in the process.

@ Mancha - I'll keep that in mind, although it is a pretty slim vehicle...
@ Sangennaru - Yeah I have split those up in the design e.g. steering wheel, tyres etc.

I might as well show what I'm planning on building:


Well... something like that.

The main carriage will be one piece, perhaps with some details on the bottom to put on separately. Wheels will be separate, as will the steering. Metal rails may be a go, too.

Not sure wether resin or metal would be better, but hopefully I won't need to worry about that just yet.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2010, 12:53:06 AM by Christian »

Offline Furt

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Re: Vehicles: scratchbuilding for production
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2010, 09:20:28 PM »
Yeah baby!!
A prisoner of war is a man who tries to kill you and fails, and then asks you not to kill him.

http://adventuresinlead.blogspot.com/


 

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