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Author Topic: Plastering Adobe Buildings?  (Read 5399 times)

Offline Deathwing

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Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« on: November 23, 2009, 04:10:50 AM »
Hey all,  I'm starting my next project, which is a nice pirate town, and I was wondering if someone could clear something up for me.  I noticed that people who make Spanish style buildings cover their creations in plaster.  This may sound like a stupid question, but is this the same as ready-mix joint compound, which is what I used to fill in holes and joins when other terrain pieces.  Again, is this the same thing as filler?  I have the Gary Chalk instructions and he mentioned covering everything in plaster, I'm just wondering if I have the right stuff.  Also, has anyone had any success in using spackling paste intead of plaster, filler, etc.  I ask because I have a big pot of it for some reason.  Just to clarify, I'm based in the US so I'm not sure if we use the same terms as our international friends.  Thanks.

Joey

P.S. I feel like I have weak terrain-fu for asking this question.
Joseph McGuire, President/Janitor at Worldís End Publishing; producer of the upcoming post-apocalypse skirmish warband game This Is Not a Test.

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Offline Skrapwelder

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Re: Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2009, 04:50:48 AM »
Joint compound is what I have always used.

Offline Wirelizard

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Re: Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2009, 05:03:11 AM »
Joint compound and spackle are the same thing, far as I can tell.

Ready-mixed plaster-like stuff, which boring people use for patching walls but wargamers can put to far more interesting uses!  :D I have a small tub of stuff that goes on bright pink but dries white. It feels a bit like working with cake icing! It's not very strong, about the same as basic plaster of paris, but it's solid enough for scenery use. The brand-name on mine is called Dry-Dex; it's a white and blue tub with a bright red lid.

I know it'a available in the US as well as here in Canada, because I saw a tub of it in the corner of one of Rich's (rattrap1's) photos a few days ago!

Here's what it looks like wet, from my graveyard build thread:

Offline Operator5

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Re: Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2009, 11:44:35 AM »
Yep. That's the stuff I use.

I have also heard that some people mix it with a little PVA glue to strengthen it. I usually don't worry too much about that, but if you need it stronger...
Richard A. Johnson
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Offline Aaron

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Re: Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2009, 01:35:53 PM »
Another solution is textured gesso, sold in art stores. The spackle/joint compound tends to be much less expensive, though.

Offline Deathwing

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Re: Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2009, 06:02:16 PM »
Well thanks all for the tips.  I do know there is a big difference between spackle past and joint compound.  Joint compound is slightly thicker and can be used to fill holes and such since it can go on thick.  Spackling paste has a slightly thinner consistency and goes on in a thin coat; though both seem to have the same appearance once dry.  I had decided to switch to the paste, but now after reading some of Malamuteís LAF posts, I might try to thin down the joint compound, which I think is the same as his pollyfilla.   I wonder what ratio of compound to water he thin with?

Oh I forgot to note that tried out the joint compound last night and it warped the 5mm foamcore.  I donít feel it was especially thick!

Joey

Offline Malamute

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Re: Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2009, 06:22:24 PM »
Well thanks all for the tips.  I do know there is a big difference between spackle past and joint compound.  Joint compound is slightly thicker and can be used to fill holes and such since it can go on thick.  Spackling paste has a slightly thinner consistency and goes on in a thin coat; though both seem to have the same appearance once dry.  I had decided to switch to the paste, but now after reading some of Malamuteís LAF posts, I might try to thin down the joint compound, which I think is the same as his pollyfilla.   I wonder what ratio of compound to water he thin with?

Oh I forgot to note that tried out the joint compound last night and it warped the 5mm foamcore.  I donít feel it was especially thick!

Joey

Hi Joey, Sorry I have only just seen your thread.

Polyfilla here in the UK is a brand name and I am certain its the same as Spackle for you.
I use it straight from a ready mixed tub as its easier than having to buy it in powder form and less messy.

The amount of water I add is not measured, Now as I have had a lot of practise its just second nature.(Sorry thats not too helpful!) Basically you dont want the mixture so thin that it runs down the walls when you add it to the model. Too thick and its hard to work.
Also you only need a very thin layer. I apply it with a palette knife which is essential i think to the process and only skim a small amout across the wall.

To give you an idea of how thin, If there are pencil or pen lines on the original area you are rendering I can usually still see the lines clearly visible through the render after applying it.

If your boards warped it sounds like you had either too much or it was too wet? I Have never had the board warp on me. The church is the biggest building I have made with the largest expanse of walls and they have not showed any sign of warping.

Are you using foamboard/foamcore? the polystyrene stuff sandwiched between thin car/paper?

I hope that helps, let me know if you have any more questions and i'll try and answer them, feel free to srop me a PM if easier.
"These creatures do not die like the bee after the first sting, but go on age after age, feeding on the blood of the living"  - Abraham Van Helsing

Offline Cory

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Re: Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2009, 06:29:08 PM »
It is not the thickness necessarily but the moisture content of the material that warps the foam core. I use a fast drying spackling compound from Ace that appears to be more alchohol based than water and results in very little shrinkage and thus warping.
.

Offline odd duck

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Re: Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2009, 06:44:13 PM »
I've been using the powder form of pollyfilla and have'nt had any warping onthe foamcore sections of my projects so far.just been following Malamute's directions and keeping the layer thin.also in addition to a palate knife acouple of wooden stir sticks come in handy for getting the plaster into detail areas,stairs, windows,arches,ect.

Offline Deathwing

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Re: Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2009, 09:27:35 PM »
Thanks for the tips all.  To describe my initial process, I basically cut four walls out of foamcore, added bass wood details, and applied the filler to both sides.  I did this as I plan to have interiors.  Anyway, the warping was only on one wall, which was the one without windows or doors.  I donít think it was a matter of moisture, but rather more of too much material.  The lack of any openings meant extra material.  Plus because of the lack of significant detail on that piece, Iím probably guilty and slapping more on since I didnít have to be precise.  I think I might try out the spackle next since itís already pretty thin.  Iím afraid watering down the filler might lead to inconsistency in my building process and we canít have that.   This is my first time out with this type of building, so I figured there would be a learning curve.  I need a pirate town for Historicon , so I have some time to work out the kinks.

Malamute, while I have your attention, would you mind detailing your painting process for your buildings.  My initial review at your excellent buildings makes me think that you paint a medium brown over the entire model and then paint off-white around the major exposed areas, while leaving the areas around doors, windows, and near the ground, the initial brown.  I would guess you probably do a highlight stage as well.   Does this sound about right or is this a gross over simplification.  I would PM this question, but I feel others might appreciate learning your process.  Thank you very much.

Joey 

Offline Malamute

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Re: Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« Reply #10 on: November 24, 2009, 08:37:30 AM »

Malamute, while I have your attention, would you mind detailing your painting process for your buildings.  My initial review at your excellent buildings makes me think that you paint a medium brown over the entire model and then paint off-white around the major exposed areas, while leaving the areas around doors, windows, and near the ground, the initial brown.  I would guess you probably do a highlight stage as well.   Does this sound about right or is this a gross over simplification.  I would PM this question, but I feel others might appreciate learning your process.  Thank you very much.

Joey 


Sounds about right :)

I paint the whole building and base (except the doors and windows) in a sand colour, Humbrol desert sand is the origianl colour I now use a similar shade that I found in a DIY store in a litre tin.

Then I give the bottom of the building, say 1cm from where the building meets the base a wash of burnt umber and also wash areas of the ground with it, to give some contrast and to represent damp, dirt etc.
Then I wetbrush the building with GW bleached bone, heavy at the top and gradually less closer to the ground.
Final wetbrush of white again heavy at the top less towards ground level. The effect I am looking for is gradual change of colour from the ground up to very light at the roof.
I then paint all the doors and windows with bleached bone wait for them to dry and then wash burnt umber acrylic over all the exposed wood, when dry all wood areas receive a drybrush of bleached bone.
Then I drybrush the base in a light stone/sand colour add grass etc.

Hope that helps.

Offline Deathwing

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Re: Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« Reply #11 on: November 24, 2009, 12:13:06 PM »
Actually that does.  Thank you, sir.

Joey

Offline Malamute

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Re: Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2009, 12:59:05 PM »
I found a couple of WIP shots showing the base coat and the burnt umber Wash.





And here is the finished model for a comparison:



I hope that helps a bit with the explanation, but I think you have go the idea. Good luck, photos please when you are finished. :)

Offline Deathwing

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Re: Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« Reply #13 on: November 25, 2009, 12:12:28 AM »
Actually that is very helpful.  Thank you.

Joey

Offline Jules

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Re: Plastering Adobe Buildings?
« Reply #14 on: November 25, 2009, 10:24:53 AM »
I built mine using cork rather than foam core.  The cork is double layered to make a thicketer wall.  My mix of filler and pva is first add dry filler then add a reasonable amount of pva then add water to make it just runny enough.  The big advantage is that the cork tile has a rough and a smooth side if you use the rough on the outside then it grabs the mix and doesn't matter to much if you miss bits.

Some shots of my BoB buildings



This is a thick appication



This is a thin



 

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